Day 3 Travel Moscow, Russia

After having a rather tiring day with my local guide Anastasia last two days, I decided to visit Kremlin by myself. Although Anastasia was helpful to show me around the city, I needed my own time walking around the city reflecting the time. Luckily my hotel was 1 minute away from Kremlin and Red Square, I always passed by on the way back to hotel from walking around the city.

 

State Historical Museum
State Historical Museum

 

Red Square building
Red Square building

 

The first view that caught my eyes every time I passed by Red Square was proudly standing Statue of Marshal Zhukov. The statue was as if he celebrates Russia’s immortality. After waiting for 20minutes due to a long queue, I finally stepped into a glorious historical theatre. Starting from Pre-historic Russia, the museum conserve millions of priceless objects obtained from Romanov dynasty. Especially, what impressed me is the paintings and artefacts when Napoleon was defeated at war. The paints vividly described how France planed to invade Russia, proceed to Russia, and lost the war. So, it was like I was reading a story book.

 

Lenin's Mausoleum
Lenin’s Mausoleum

Around 2PM, the sun was strong enough to melt the snow that piled up the previous night. Walking down the street from the State Historical Museum, many people gathered in the Lenin’s Mausoleum. It is a resting place of Lenin, which is also open to the public. I did not enter the Mausoleum museum due to my schedule. However, wandering around the Mausoleum like other Soviet leaders, I put myself to the past history closing my eyes, and was imagining the Moscow in Soviet Era. There have been many voices Lenin’s body should be buried. However, Moscow preserved Lenin’s body as it is as a symbol of great Soviet communism.

 

 

View from Kremlin
View from Kremlin

 

Armoury Chamber
Armoury Chamber

 

Annunciation Cathedral
Annunciation Cathedral

 

Like a soldier with excitement of the glorious march, I, with the excitement, stepped into Kremlin after passing a security check. The security guy had a frozen Russian-like unexpressive face. But, as always, he Kindly pointed me to the way to the Kremlin, and greeted me saying “Enjoy”.

The sky became grey, and wind started blowing that touched my face and hands with its cold air. Kremlin was very spacious, so it took me a couple of hours walking and dropping by cathedrals, and museums.

The history of Kremlin was traced back to the the 500th century B. And the history as a fortification began in the 11th century when when Yuri Dolgoruky, Grand Duke of Kiev, built a wooden fort. The design of the fortress was done by Italian architect, with the initiation from Grand Prince Ivan III.

The Kremlin was a residence of Tsar until Peter the Great who moved the capital to St. Petersburg. While walking along the Kremlin wall looking over the Moscow River, I thought about a hardship the fortification went through during the Soviet Era, when many building were destroyed. The sound of ‘Kremlin’ shaped by media and the rest now turned to one of the normal historical places that witnessed a Moscow’s fall and rise.

 

Beautiful Mayakovskaya Metro Station
Beautiful Mayakovskaya Metro Station

 

Moscow’s winter was tough. I was unable to stand outside more than 2-3 hours. I left the Red Squire and Kremlin that turned serene with the sunset. Even on the metro train, I was still in a surreal moment being in a mysterious country that changed the world. Soaking myself into the memory of the old Cold War period, I enjoyed the Moscow’s night view that was still giving off the ambience of communist era.

 

Useful Information

10 Things To Do In Moscow, Russia

Day 1-2, Travel Moscow, Russia

Day 2 Travel Moscow, Russia

Day 4 Travel Moscow, Russia 

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